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From Analyst to Yoga Teacher

http://online.wsj.com

Tingting Peng had been in banking for a few months when she started to feel miserable. She had landed an investment-banking analyst job at Morgan Stanley in Hong Kong straight out of college when she was 21 years old. The salary was great for someone her age -- US$50,000 base plus bonus -- but the job was all consuming. "After six months, I felt burned out," says Ms. Peng, who is now 26. Gradually her health began to suffer. One bout of flu morphed into another, with viruses and stomach bugs in between. "I was sick for weeks on end, but I would self-medicate and still go to work," says Ms. Peng. Unhappy and unwell, she spent thousands of dollars on clothes, bags and shoes she didn't need. "I was looking to superficial things to make me feel better," she says.

She left Morgan Stanley after two years, then bounced between finance jobs for another two years. When the last one -- as a research analyst with a hedge fund -- cratered, Ms. Peng took a break and went to see her family in Boston. Gradually the idea of starting her own fitness business began to crystallize. Exercise was the one thing that kept her going during her four-year finance stint.

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3

Minnie Driver: 'Surfing and yoga are my religion'

http://www.noballs.co.uk

Surfing and yoga are so much more than forms of exercise, they are a religion, according to actress Minnie Driver. Driver, who has appeared in films including Good Will Hunting and TV series such as Revisioned: Tomb Raider and Will and Grace, told website monstersandcritics.com that she cannot get by without riding the waves or practicing the Indian meditative poses. "My church is surfing and yoga. If I can get in a surf or practice yoga then I will. "Yoga's great for when you've got a full brain and can't stop the mind chatter," the 40-year-old said. Earlier this month, Marissa Campise, winner of Huffington Post Living's Total Energy Makeover, suggested in a piece for the newspaper that, to ensure she thinks clearly, she too dons her ladies yoga clothing and practices her favourite yoga poses. She said that the form of meditation helps to de-clutter her mind and improve her mental clarity.

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3

Don't Judge a Fitness Class by Its Teacher

http://www.fitsugar.com

Since I'm a yoga instructor, I love to try out different types of yoga classes when I'm traveling. I've taken Jivamukti yoga classes before and really like the flowy movements and the spiritual side, so I was excited to try out a class while visiting some family recently. I'm so glad that this wasn't my first Jivamukti class, because I almost walked out halfway through. The instructor had an annoyingly low, monotone voice, the sequence of postures was really sporadic, and when she adjusted me in Rotated Triangle, she accidentally pushed me over. She also played music really loud, and not serene yoga music — she was blasting Bob Marley. I left feeling more stressed out than when I started. My point here is that you shouldn't judge a class based on the person who taught it. Even though certain types of movement classes such as ballet or Salsa will cover the same techniques and positions no matter where you take them, they're often taught differently, depending on the instructor. One teacher may talk you through a class and walk around helping, while another may stand in the front of the room and demonstrate without saying much at all.

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3

Yoga: Ancient practice, modern benefits

http://www.qctimes.com

Sally McGlone got involved in yoga several years ago as a way to treat back trouble.
Diana Sauser took a yoga class to supplement a fitness routine and as a way to stretch and strengthen muscles. "This is part of my way to get new control over my life," she said. Both women have embraced yoga, an ancient practice of mind and body movement rooted in 5,000 years of tradition that has become mainstream today.
Yoga classes are available all around the Quad-Cities, but McGlone and Saucer are enrolled in one at the Trinity Enrichment Center in Davenport.
"More people are interested in getting involved in mind and body exercises," instructor Dena DeFauw said. "It's like having an hour's vacation from your life," said Jeani Mackenzie, who heads up the Davenport School of Yoga. Mackenzie, who has been practicing yoga since 1974, is an original Quad-City area instructor and was DeFauw's first teacher. There are various types of yoga, but Hatha yoga is the dominant form taught in this region. Area yoga schools typically offer beginning and advanced classes, drop-in sessions, introductory methods and related services, including massage.

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3

New form of yoga anything but serene

http://content.usatoday.com

You've heard of Hatha Yoga and Hot Yoga, now -- no joke -- there's Laughter Yoga, The Herald-Sun in Durham, N.C., reported. During a three-day workshop at Patanjali's Place yoga center in Durham, participants pretended to be laughing in an elevator, then laughing with friends, then whooping it up over imaginary tea and wine, the paper said. "I had so much energy," participant Hope Gregory told the newspaper. "It was joyful energy." Laughter Yoga was started by Madan Kataria, a doctor from Mumbai, India, and combines laughter, improvisation and yogic breathing, the Herald-Sun reported. Instructor Susan Ludwig told the paper, "Even if we ... fake laughter, just the act releases endorphins."

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