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Yoga: Ancient practice, modern benefits

http://www.qctimes.com

Sally McGlone got involved in yoga several years ago as a way to treat back trouble.
Diana Sauser took a yoga class to supplement a fitness routine and as a way to stretch and strengthen muscles. "This is part of my way to get new control over my life," she said. Both women have embraced yoga, an ancient practice of mind and body movement rooted in 5,000 years of tradition that has become mainstream today.
Yoga classes are available all around the Quad-Cities, but McGlone and Saucer are enrolled in one at the Trinity Enrichment Center in Davenport.
"More people are interested in getting involved in mind and body exercises," instructor Dena DeFauw said. "It's like having an hour's vacation from your life," said Jeani Mackenzie, who heads up the Davenport School of Yoga. Mackenzie, who has been practicing yoga since 1974, is an original Quad-City area instructor and was DeFauw's first teacher. There are various types of yoga, but Hatha yoga is the dominant form taught in this region. Area yoga schools typically offer beginning and advanced classes, drop-in sessions, introductory methods and related services, including massage.

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New form of yoga anything but serene

http://content.usatoday.com

You've heard of Hatha Yoga and Hot Yoga, now -- no joke -- there's Laughter Yoga, The Herald-Sun in Durham, N.C., reported. During a three-day workshop at Patanjali's Place yoga center in Durham, participants pretended to be laughing in an elevator, then laughing with friends, then whooping it up over imaginary tea and wine, the paper said. "I had so much energy," participant Hope Gregory told the newspaper. "It was joyful energy." Laughter Yoga was started by Madan Kataria, a doctor from Mumbai, India, and combines laughter, improvisation and yogic breathing, the Herald-Sun reported. Instructor Susan Ludwig told the paper, "Even if we ... fake laughter, just the act releases endorphins."

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Hindu leader Rajan Zed calls Jennifer Aniston's yoga practice superficial

http://www.examiner.com

Hindu leader and statesman Rajan Zed says Jennifer Aniston's yoga practice is superficial. The Hollywood star, who is a huge advocate for the practice, is said to have only scratched the surface of what yoga really is, says Zed. What hot celebrity singer uses weed and yoga to heed off depression?, Zed issued a statement in Nevada today extending an invitation for Aniston to get more involved in her yoga practice by adopting Hinduism. "If Aniston needed any spiritual direction, I or other Hindu scholars would gladly provide it," Zed offered. But 40-year-old Aniston has been a long-time practitioner of yoga and already says the practice has reached beyond a physical workout by changing her body and her mind. "Mandy [Ingber, Aniston's yoga instructor] has brought yoga into my life," Aniston said in her introduction to Mandy's Yoga DVD, Yogalosophy. Adding, "This workout will change your body and your mind”. But Zed says Aniston must turn to Hinduism to get the full effect and while he has yet to address Ingber's infusion of astrology into the practice, Aniston says the infusion is what keeps her coming back for more.

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Geriatrics experts discuss the upside of growing older

http://www.washingtonpost.com

If you think that getting older is the beginning of the end, think again. Sure, skin loses some elasticity and joints get creaky, and maybe you can't keep your eyes open past 9:30 p.m. But even people well into their 80s are going to yoga and Pilates classes, volunteering, having sex and taking college courses. In short, getting older has its upside. Don't believe it? Then listen to these experts: John Murphy is a Brown University Medical School professor and expert on geriatrics; Cheryl Phillips is chief medical officer of On Lok, a nonprofit organization in San Francisco that advocates for the elderly and for long-term care. Here's what they had to say about aging, in separate interviews: What gets better as you age? Murphy: Memories and stories get better. I think that past recollections, which are so much richer than in my younger patients, can really flavor how [older people] respond to new occurrences in life. Seniors generally identify quality of life as good. As we age, we each start to develop a sense of perspective that makes us more valuable in contributing to society.

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'Tough yoga' method uses body as tool to improve itself: a Stretching Out column

http://www.cleveland.com

Yoga, for me, is synonymous with muddling. Every class I take, I spend the hour not so much enjoying the real benefits as trying to look like I know what the heck I'm doing.
What I need is remedial help, someone to slow it down and work one-on-one to address issues of flexibility, strength and stability specific to my body. Then maybe I'd be prepared to join the yoga masses. What I need, come to think of it, is a few more sessions with Colette Barry, owner of Healthy Fit Studio in Westlake. One round of her "Tough Men, Tough Yoga" program wasn't enough, even if it did expose just about all my physical flaws. The differences between Barry's place and a typical yoga studio are many. For one, you're never going to hear her utter the words "chi" or "chakra." Foremost, though, is that Barry, daughter of a chiropractor, is less interested in transcending gravity than using it to her advantage. In other words, she uses body weight as a force for stretching. Also, unlike so many of her peers, Barry is not averse to machines and draws liberally from principles of Pilates. She also incorporates walls into her routines, using vertical surfaces for stability and resistance.

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